June 7, 2014 at 7:10pm
Our Perspective issue is all about the many different ways many different people could view the world, and what such perceptions could produce in the fields of literature and art. It also features interviews with Cavan McCarthy of Swim Deep, SNL cast member Noël Wells on her photography, Bela Takes Chase, The Ransom Collective, The Aquadolls, and several amazing artists whose work you’ve got to see, as well as poetry, personal essays, watercolor, beautiful photos and more. 
Read it here and download here. 

Our Perspective issue is all about the many different ways many different people could view the world, and what such perceptions could produce in the fields of literature and art. It also features interviews with Cavan McCarthy of Swim Deep, SNL cast member Noël Wells on her photography, Bela Takes Chase, The Ransom Collective, The Aquadolls, and several amazing artists whose work you’ve got to see, as well as poetry, personal essays, watercolor, beautiful photos and more. 

Read it here and download here

Summer Tunes

April 1, 2014 at 12:24am

The sun-soaked days are stretching ahead and your ears are in dire need of refreshing musical therapy. Lucky for all of us, these three tracks are here just for that. 

Northern-Irish multi-instrumentalist Peter McCauley, also known as RAMS’ Pocket Radio, released "Love is a Bitter Thing" mid-March this year. The lead single off his debut album Béton, “Love is a Bitter Thing” is an emotional, raw piano-heavy track paired with clear, powerful vocals reminiscent of Matt Duke and Tom Odell. Listen here.

Mountain Bird’s new single "Violent Night," out April 6th, is a testament to the Stockholm-based dream-poppers’ ability to create atmospheric and layered music that builds up to an incredible hearing experience, vivid and galvanic. Listen here.

Belgian electro-indie quartet Pale Grey (think Foals + Noah and the Whale) are releasing their debut album Best Friends this April, and single “Seaside” is definitely the perfect track to help you beat the heat. The video is a visual tribute to beach culture with gorgeous coloring, but the song is enough to take you to the waves. Listen here.

Béla Takes Chase - “Radiate”

February 8, 2014 at 8:58pm

Aussie London-based singer-songwriter Béla’s new single “Radiate” is coming out tomorrow, and upon first listen, it takes you someplace else, somewhere neon-lit and possibility-ridden. It’s the kind of song that transforms and evolves as the seconds tick past, which is always a recipe for addictive tunes you’ll want to put on repeat. Garnering comparisons to Lenka, Ellie Goulding, Stevie Nicks, Beach House and London Grammar, it’s easy to understand why listeners can’t get enough of her lyrics, atmospheric instrumentals or her voice. 

Listen to “Radiate” here

January 20, 2014 at 11:59pm
Our January-March issue Sleepless celebrates the uniqueness of the vulnerable hours and features The Maine, This Century, Nick Santino, Malcolm De Ruiter, Emma Koenig, Luigi D’Avola and more, plus fiction, poetry, a non-fiction anthology on endless nights and a virtual trip around New York City. 
It can be viewed on Issuu here and downloaded here. 

Our January-March issue Sleepless celebrates the uniqueness of the vulnerable hours and features The Maine, This Century, Nick Santino, Malcolm De Ruiter, Emma Koenig, Luigi D’Avola and more, plus fiction, poetry, a non-fiction anthology on endless nights and a virtual trip around New York City. 

It can be viewed on Issuu here and downloaded here

14 Filed under: #0114

Ed Zealous - “Diamonds for Eyes”

January 14, 2014 at 9:18pm

It’s no secret that if “breakout genres” were a thing, 2013’s would be indie and electronic music, at least for mainstream listeners. For Belfast-based quartet Ed Zealous, however, it’s always been a hearty, galvanic, powerful mix of both since they formed in 2009. This hasn’t been made more apparent than by the Eliot James-produced “Diamonds for Eyes,” the lead single off their debut album Wired (out early this year), to be released on January 20th, 2014. With a sound influenced by the likes of Talking Heads, Pulp, David Bowie, A-Trak, TV on the Radio and Boys Noize, it’s no wonder that they’ve been gaining traction as a band to watch out for. 

The first listen brings Two Door Cinema Club to mind, which won’t be a wonder as the boys opened for them last year. The vocals are reminiscent of Gabe Saporta of Midtown and Cobra Starship, especially with all the synths and energy, but don’t be fazed—Ed Zealous are definitely way, way far from being a keytar punk band. Somehow, coming up with such a danceable, addictive tune with their signature infectious loops, they’ve managed to make it simultaneously easy to relax to, which makes “Diamonds for Eyes” the perfect pick-me-up at the end of a long day or first thing in the morning when you need something to remind you that it’s a brand new day so you need to wake up! Fans of indie pop and house will agree that this is a rad single—if you’re neither, don’t be surprised if you find yourself nodding along, anyway. 

Listen here and see for yourself. 

Juliette Commagere - “Big Star”

November 21, 2013 at 11:36pm

LA-based singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Juliette Commagere (formerly of Hello Stranger) cemented herself as a musical powerhouse with the release of two solo albums, Queens Die Proudly in 2008 and The Procession in 2010.

Three years later, she is coming out with "Big Star," the lead single off what will be her third record, Human, out early 2014. 

From the press release: 

She has shared the stage with Grammy-Award nominated Linda Perry, Air, The Bird and The Bee’s Greg Kurstin (Lily Allen, Ladyhawke, Little Boots, The Flaming Lips) and Nick Lowe (Elvis Costello, Graham Parker) just to name a few. She was personally asked to open for The Foo Fighters and supported Bat For Lashes at the Latitude Festival.

The upcoming single “Big Star” is taken from Juliette’s new album Human. With “Big Star” she constructs a dark and evocative musical landscape meant for the starkness of the Mojave Desert or night drives through L.A.— when the sun is getting low. Within the song one can hear touches of Kate Bush, Imogen Heap, Norah Jones, Mandalay and Sia. “Big Star” offers a natural blend of fragility, femininity, beauty and soft ambience.

The effortless vocal delivery carries softly through the song, combined with a rich collection of piano and other sparkling sounds. Its momentous rhythm brings an electronic vibe to the choruses, and the mild drumbeat, generously covered in reverb, adds an ethereal and almost haunting feel to the track.

Juliette’s voice feels soft as silk and at times almost disappears into itself. The production is impressive and big, yet it’s barely there at all. Synth sounds layered cautiously on top of each other in harmony, create an unforgettable experience for any listener who wants to put their headphones on, close their eyes and simply listen.

We here at Elision think that she sounds like Ellie Goulding on a low-key but fun late Friday night. 

"Big Star" will be available for purchase and download on November 24th. In the meantime, listen to it here and follow Juliette Commagere on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

November 18, 2013 at 1:04am

Photos by Joe Hernandez
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George Barnett: Animal Keeper EP [Review]

November 10, 2013 at 5:00am

Rarely do we see a young musician as talented and unprecedented as George Barnett. The 19-year-old multi-instrumentalist and songwriter comes out with the highly-anticipated Animal Keeper EP on November 10th, and the singles he has come out with so far (the eponymous “Animal Keeper,” which has been on heavy rotation as a BBC Introducing track on Radio 1, and “Reflection,” which recently premiered on Indie Shuffle) have been the subject of much praise and raving. 

It’s been widely acknowledged that Barnett writes, plays, and produces all of his tracks almost entirely by himself, and on Animal Keeper, he completely astounds and proves that he really was only just getting started—he’s even better, and he’s not messing around. Taking cues from his own musical interests (lots of R&B lately) but not letting them overpower his signature style, this new release is just polished—and more than versatile enough—to please even the most plucky listener, yet remains distinctly true and consistent to what we’ve heard from him so far. For someone who leaps from genre to genre, Barnett sure manages to make his tracks fit together seamlessly and complement each other. 

The title track is a great example of his tendency to be focused and a perfectionist when creating, as it is heavy and energetic, combining lots of synth and percussion with a catchy hook and lyrics that are, as always, intelligent and forceful. Critics and writers have been gushing about the vocal harmonies and Barnett’s falsetto, and it won’t be so hard to see why. The last song on the EP is a remix of it called “(Is This How I Want to Live??”) and offers an interesting new way to experience the song, and while it feels more like an interlude than an actual track, it’s quite the apt and satisfying way to close the playlist. 

"Reflection," meanwhile, starts off as a galvanic piano ballad that switches gears to edgy territory and not unlike "Animal Keeper," then throws it all together in the choruses for an effect that’s both dreamy and resolute in all the best ways. Somehow, this makes it simultaneously a radio-friendly track and something you’d hear in underground music clubs with every person in the crowd lost in singing along. Finally, "Don’t Tell Me" makes use of yet another Ear Worm-esque hook and falsetto, as well as an amazingly executed hip-hop sound that requires another listen or two because it’s just. That. Good. "Don’t tell me/I’m falling in love," Barnett sings. Funny, my ears feel the same way. 

George Barnett is featured on the October-December issue of our e-zine.  

Listen to the first two tracks from Animal Keeper here, buy the EP here, and view the “Animal Keeper” music video here. Check him out on Twitter, YouTubeFacebook, Tumblr, and his website

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